Samari Utthan Sewa | POWER of SKILL
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POWER of SKILL

POWER of SKILL

Whatever I am now is because of Samari. It brought my family together. I feel proud of remembering my own story. -Arati Paswan

I was 13 when I got married. By 18, I had two sons. The younger one was three months old when I underwent a family planning operation as suggested by my husband. But slowly things turned worse as my husband got married to somebody else. My younger son was only 18 months old then. I was treated badly by my in-laws. My husband abuses forced me to leave the house.

I went to live with my mother. My father passed away seven years back. My mother raised my brother, four sisters and me with difficulty.

She was a helping hand when I needed. I needed to learn some skills to become self-dependent. With my mother’s support, I enrolled in tailoring training. When my husband got to know about this, he started torturing me more.

One day on my way to training, he stopped me. “If you want to go out of home, give me divorce first,” he demanded. He beat me mercilessly on the road.

A council with village men decided that I must live with my husband, his second wife, and the family. The family did not accept me. The husband would beat me every day.

He left for abroad two years after which I came in contact with Bimala Gayak of SUS. She helped need women like me. I then joined the cutting and tailoring training organized by Samari. This left me in awe as I had given up learning when my husband asked me to. This also made me confident. I started sewing really well.

I help people know the facilities provided by VDC, health posts, ministry of women and children. Whatever I am now is because of Samari. It brought my family together. I feel proud of remembering my own story.

Later, I bought a sewing machine and started tailoring business at home. When Samari organized six months of training on tailoring for other women in the village, I was selected as a trainer. I trained 10 other women. They even paid. I felt empowered.

With the money, I bought a piece of one kattha (0.084 acres) land. That helped me start a new life. I built my own small home there and there was no fear of being sent out. Everything I did was with my tailoring business. My sons could go to school.

I was living life of my own that dragged the husband and his mother to my home. They offered me to live with them. He promised he wouldn’t torture me anymore. We started living together. My daughter-in-law and my husband’s other wife started helping me with the work. We would earn 15 to 20 thousand a month.

We all shared love and happiness. I am happy I did my part to make the family happy. Besides family, the society looks up to me. If some woman gets in trouble, I am called out.

I am one of their guardians. I also work as an insurance agent to a company. Out of 80 people I have helped insuring, 60 are women. I also help providing privilege cards to elderly and people with disabilities for their Social Security Fund.

I help people know the facilities provided by VDC, health posts, ministry of women and children. Whatever I am now is because of Samari. It brought my family together. I feel proud of remembering my own story.

There were days my son and I suffered. The boys were deprived of family love. Life showed us dark days but I never gave up. People used to talk back. Now I am happy as things have changed.

In the society where women weren’t allowed even to look at men, I interact confidently with everyone despite the gender. Other women have started following the same which makes me immensely happy.

My husband’s family loves me like their own. I suggest everyone never to lose hope in life and learn something for yourselves. Be patient and things will fall in places. Sufferings lead us to happiness, I assure, start the journey and you’ll be there.

Many people think of ending their lives in difficult situations which is not the solution. Killing yourself means accepting defeat. Live life the way you want and try looking for light at the end of every tunnel. If you are right, you’ll receive right. Stay grounded. It will take you a long way.